The School of Veterinary Medicine of Rowan University

  • veterinarian caring for goat

The School of Veterinary Medicine of Rowan University

The School of Veterinary Medicine of Rowan University

The School of Veterinary Medicine of Rowan University will be the first in New Jersey.

Once accredited, the School will offer New Jersey’s first Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree, as well as related degree programs designed to shape the future of veterinary medicine and animal health care in the state.

With the addition of the School of Veterinary Medicine, Rowan University will be one of only two universities in the nation offering Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degrees.

Focused on practical research at the intersection of medicine, engineering, science, business and the environment, the School of Veterinary Medicine is uniquely qualified to advance the health and well-being of animals and humans through the “One Health Concept.” That is, there is “one medicine” supporting “one health.” We expect our graduates to address societal concerns in the broadest sense while improving patient outcomes.

Students

The School plans to welcome its first class of 60 students in fall 2025. Enrollment is expected to eventually grow to 90 students per class.

Meeting the Rising Demand for Veterinary Care

Interest in veterinary degrees and demand for veterinary care is high nationwide. Applications for veterinary medical colleges have been on the rise in recent years, averaging about 6-7% in annual growth. During the 2020-21 admissions cycle, the number of applicants rose by a staggering 19%.

Moreover, of the 33 accredited veterinary schools in the nation, only five are on the east coast. A veterinary school in New Jersey will help keep talented and high-achieving students in our state, reduce the cost of veterinary education for New Jersey residents, and attract out-of-state veterinary students to New Jersey.

In 2006, the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges predicted a shortage of 15,000 veterinarians in the United States within two decades.

The American Veterinary Medical Association states that 57% of New Jersey households own a pet.

An Innovative Approach to Curriculum and Clinical Preparation

A concern for health and the diseases of animals, humans and the environment provides the unifying theme for the undergraduate, professional, and graduate programs of the School of Veterinary Medicine.

The curriculum combines teaching, research, clinical observation and evidence-based approaches to practice to develop capable, career-ready veterinarians prepared for the rigors of the profession.

Rather than replicating traditional models, the school will adopt a less traditional curriculum, both in format and delivery. The approach will differentiate the school from current and costly models of veterinary medical education while bringing innovation in curriculum delivery, operational cost efficiency, affordability and job readiness.

The curriculum will incorporate core competencies, as appropriate, using a spectrum of contemporary teaching and learning techniques. Extensive clinical experiences will begin early in the curriculum through rotations between classroom lectures, clinical observation and practice. The approach ensures job readiness for graduates on day one. Online, virtual reality, and simulation models will be integral to student learning experiences.

The education and teaching of clinical skills represent the core of knowledge and application of clinical skills for diagnosis, treatment, and control of diseases and for improving animal health and well-being.

The School of Veterinary Medicine of Rowan University will pioneer student scholarly research and the discovery of new knowledge in basic and applied sciences, while maintaining a strong commitment to both routine and specialized veterinary medical care and service.

With emphasis on the interrelatedness of animals, humans, and the environment, the school will utilize academic talent and resources of Rowan’s two medical schools, the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering, the College of Science & Mathematics, and clinical partnerships with private and community-based veterinary practices to support student success. Additionally, the school will utilize its key partnerships with its affiliated Rowan colleges to advance pathways for aspiring veterinary professionals.

Graduates of the school are expected to acquire a broad set of relevant skills, competencies and appreciation for cultural diversity throughout the curriculum, enabling them to work productively and effectively with both their patients and their human counterparts, which, upon graduation, increases their value in the veterinary market.